Tunas and Billfishes of the World

by eea | Thursday, August 22, 2019 - 12:00 PM

I co-authored Tunas and Billfishes of the World with John Graves as the culmination of my 60 years of research on tunas, which began with studying tunas caught on a long-line cruise aboard the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries (now NOAA) vessel “Delaware” in the summer of 1957.

After completion of my Ph.D. at Cornell University—studying small freshwater fishes known as darters—I was hired by the Systematics Laboratory based in the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. I was asked to straighten out the taxonomic relationships of tunas and to do it well enough that “the damned names won’t keep changing.”

After seven years of dissecting and measuring, Bob Gibbs and I concluded that there were seven species of tunas in one genus. I proceeded to study the rest of the family Scombridae: the bonitos (1975), Spanish mackerels (1984), double-lined mackerels (1992), frigate tunas (1996), and mackerels (1998), with several other papers on their relationships from 1979 to 1999. I co-authored a widely used catalog of the species for FAO in 1983.

In 2008, I was asked to chair the Tuna and Billfish Specialist Group of the IUCN (International Union...Read More

Teaching Public Health

by eea | Tuesday, August 20, 2019 - 12:00 PM

The need to train public health professionals with knowledge and skills to address complex problems is greater than ever. There are more schools and programs of public health than ever with growing numbers of faculty coming from an ever-broader range of disciplines. Yet, there are few resources to support these dedicated faculty in teaching.

Public health faculty who are engaged in teaching face challenges that are relatively unique. Public health must be responsive to contemporary social issues that influence the health of the public. Effective public health teachers must then continue to embrace emerging issues, incorporate new educational strategies and technologies, and engage with a highly diverse student body that is passionate about issues of contemporary concern. Public health faculty need easily accessible strategies and exemplars of best practices in course design, active learning, group and collaborative learning, and the ever-challenging evaluation of learning that can rise to meet these challenges.

Teaching Public Health is designed for faculty teaching public health, bringing together a state-of-the-field collection of contributions from faculty experts in the field. This book provides teachers of public health and leaders in academic public health with a cutting-edge primer...Read More

JMGS Welcomes New Editorial Leadership

by bjs | Monday, August 19, 2019 - 10:00 AM

The Journal of Modern Greek Studies has a new editorial team. Johanna Hanink from Brown University is the Arts & Humanities Editor while Antonis Ellinas from the University of Cyprus is the Social Sciences Editor. They joined us to talk about their path to the masthead and future plans for the journal.

Audio titled Johanna Hanink and Atonis Ellinas, Journal of Modern Greek Studies by JHU Press

The Journal of Modern Greek Studies has a new editorial team. Johanna Hanink from Brown University is the Arts & Humanities Editor while Antonis Ellinas from the University of Cyprus is the Social Sciences Editor. They joined us to talk about their path to the masthead and future plans for the journal.

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Flickering Treasures: National Building Museum Exhibit Highlights Historic Baltimore Theaters

by eea | Thursday, August 15, 2019 - 5:00 PM

Flickering Treasures: Rediscovering Baltimore's Forgotten Movie Theaters by Amy Davis was published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2017, and is currently the subject of an exhibition at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. Recently, Amy was interviewed by JHU Press staff member Will Holmes about the exhibit, which runs through February 17, 2020.

Your book Flickering Treasures: Rediscovering Baltimore's Forgotten Movie Theaters is a great fit for an exhibit at the National Building Museum. What sparked the idea for the exhibit, and how did it come to fruition?

I thought that Flickering Treasures would translate well as a museum exhibition, and considered several venues. I approached the National Building Museum in the fall of 2016 because their mission is to explore the history of architecture in a holistic way, by looking at the impact of the built environment on society and our personal lives. My book meshes well with these themes, by highlighting the eclectic architecture of movie theaters and issues of preservation. Flickering Treasures , through photographs and oral histories, examines how these buildings evolved, shaped their communities, and sparked the...Read More

Activism in the Woke Academy

by bjs | Thursday, August 15, 2019 - 12:00 PM

Earlier this year, the Review of Higher Education released a supplemental issue in response to the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) 2018 Conference Theme: Envisioning the Woke Academy . Issue editors D-L Stewart and Lori D. Patton joined us for a Q&A about how the issue, titled Activism in the Woke Academy: Scholars Review the Last Half-Century , came together and how they hope the issue will resonate in the field.

What was the process of turning the 2018 ASHE conference theme into a special issue of the association's journal like? We first thought together about what the central story of the ASHE conference theme, "Envisioning the Woke Academy," was. What we realized as we considered this was the role of activism in pushing change and transformation in higher education in the U.S. and across the globe since 1968. From there, it was easy to see how activism and equity would be good fodder for a special issue of RHE.

How important is it for academics today to be "woke?" If we consider "woke" to be the commitment...Read More