Mental Health Resources from JHUP

 

MENTAL HEALTH MATTERS

Mental health is something we should not take for granted. Depression, anxiety, mood disorders and other mental health issues impact the well being of millions of Americans everyday. Yet many of us don't know how to talk to each other about mental wellness. Below is a list of resources and texts aimed at promoting discussion and equiping readers with the facts and tools to fight for mental health. If you or a loved one suffers from depression, anxiety, or other mental health issues please know you are not alone. Mental health is just as important as physical health. Take care. Ask for help. Be Well.

 

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Explaining the basics of mental health—including sleep hygiene, diet and nutrition, exercise, routine and structure, and avoiding isolation—Managing Your Depression empowers people to participate in their own care, offering them a better chance of getting, and staying, well. 

     

In her book, When Someone You Know Has DepressionDr Noonan describes effective communication strategies to use during episodes of depression and offers essential advice for finding appropriate professional help.

    

In Take Control of Your Depression, Dr. Susan J. Noonan provides people experiencing depression with strategies to take stock of their mental state, to chart a course toward emotional balance, and to track their progress on the journey to well-being. 

    

Dr. Francis Mark Mondimore, author of the best-selling book Bipolar Disorder: A Guide for Patients and Families, here explains depression—its causes and symptoms, and its treatment. In Depression: the Mood Disease he discusses depression in all age groups and in both sexes, as well as bipolar disorder, seasonal affective disorders, and depression that accompanies illness. This edition encompasses more than a decade of new research, advances in pharmacology, and changes in public perception. 

    

In a culture obsessed with youth, financial success, and achieving happiness, is it possible to live an authentic, meaningful life? Nassir Ghaemi, director of the Mood Disorder Program at Tufts Medical Center, reflects on our society's current quest for happiness and rejection of any emotion resembling sadness. On Depression asks readers to consider the benefits of despair and the foibles of an unexamined life. 

    

Women are twice as likely as men to become depressed. While they seek help for mental disorders more often than men, they also seek to help others, trying to keep everyone happy while taking care of parents, spouses, and children. Sometimes, doing it all is doing too much. In Finding Your Emotional Balance, Dr. Merry Noel Miller offers women of all ages advice for coping with life’s challenges while increasing its joys.

  

In Still Down, Dr. Dean F. MacKinnon, a psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins Medical School, presents nine composite stories drawn from patients he has seen in his twenty years as an expert in treatment-resistant mood disorders. The first section of the book features people diagnosed with depression who have not yet received appropriate treatment. The next section looks at misdiagnosis, focusing on people who feel and appear depressed but who have different mood disorders and need treatment for them. Finally, Dr. MacKinnon describes people who have severe depression that does not respond to any treatment, regardless of how finely tuned the treatment might be. These people, who suffer from true treatment-resistant depression (TRD), can benefit from a variety of treatments to feel better. 

    

In Adolescent Depression, psychiatrists Francis Mark Mondimore, MD, and Patrick Kelly, MD, explain that serious depression in adolescents goes beyond “moodiness.” Depression is in fact an illness—one that can be effectively treated. The authors describe the many forms of depression and the many symptoms of depression in young people—from sadness to irritability, self-harm, drug and alcohol abuse, and violent rages. 

    

In Mental Health Issues and the University Student Dr. Iarovici describes the current college mental health crisis and narrates how college mental health services have evolved along with changes in student populations. She discusses students’ lifestyle problems and psychiatric concerns, using case vignettes to explore a variety of interventions. Included are discussions of substance abuse, relationship difficulties, eating disorders, depression and anxiety, and culture clashes. Problems uniquely addressed in this book include sleep disturbances and perfectionism. An essential component of the volume is a guide to making emergency assessments, from risk classification and hospitalization to public safety and communication within and outside the campus community.

    

Physical problems and emotional stresses, such as bereavement, health conditions, pain, concerns about the future, side effects of medications, and the accumulated effects of lifestyle choices, may lead to depression or anxiety in older people. However, as Drs. Mark D. Miller and Charles F. Reynolds III know, these mental disorders are not a natural or an inevitable part of aging. In Depression and Anxiety in Later Life, these psychiatrists show how depression and anxiety can be avoided or minimized by adapting to changing circumstances while controlling risk factors and getting help when it's needed.

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