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Paris, Capital of the Black Atlantic

Literature, Modernity, and Diaspora

edited by Jeremy Braddock and Jonathan P. Eburne

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How black writers’ travel to Paris contributed to the transatlantic circulation of art and ideas.

Paris has always fascinated and welcomed writers. Throughout the twentieth and into the twenty-first century, writers of American, Caribbean, and African descent were no exception. Paris, Capital of the Black Atlantic considers the travels made to Paris—whether literally or imaginatively—by black writers. These collected essays explore the transatlantic circulation of ideas, texts, and objects to which such travels to Paris contributed.

Editors Jeremy Braddock and Jonathan P. Eburne expand upon an...

How black writers’ travel to Paris contributed to the transatlantic circulation of art and ideas.

Paris has always fascinated and welcomed writers. Throughout the twentieth and into the twenty-first century, writers of American, Caribbean, and African descent were no exception. Paris, Capital of the Black Atlantic considers the travels made to Paris—whether literally or imaginatively—by black writers. These collected essays explore the transatlantic circulation of ideas, texts, and objects to which such travels to Paris contributed.

Editors Jeremy Braddock and Jonathan P. Eburne expand upon an acclaimed special issue of the journal Modern Fiction Studies with four new essays and a revised introduction. Beginning with W. E. B. Du Bois’s trip to Paris in 1900 and ending with the contemporary state of diasporic letters in the French capital, this collection embraces theoretical close readings, materialist intellectual studies of networks, comparative essays, and writings at the intersection of literary and visual studies. Paris, Capital of the Black Atlantic is unique both in its focus on literary fiction as a formal and sociological category and in the range of examples it brings to bear on the question of Paris as an imaginary capital of diasporic consciousness.

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Reviews

An invaluable contribution to the scholarship and pedagogy of Afro-Modernism, Afro-Diasporic Studies, and Black Atlantic Studies.

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Book Details

Publication Date
Status
Available
Trim Size
6
x
9
Pages
376
ISBN
9781421407791
Illustration Description
10 b&w photos
Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Part I: Afro-Modernism
Chapter 1. Cultural Artifacts and the Narrative of History: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Exhibiting of Culture at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle
C

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Part I: Afro-Modernism
Chapter 1. Cultural Artifacts and the Narrative of History: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Exhibiting of Culture at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle
Chapter 2. "The Only Real White Democracy" and the Language of Liberation: The Great War, France, and African American Culture in the 1920s
Chapter 3. "No One, I Am Sure, Is Ever Homesick in Paris": Jessie Fauset's French Imaginary
Chapter 4. Writing Home: Comparative Black Modernism and Form in Jean Toomer and Aimé Césaire
Chapter 5. Embodied Fictions, Melancholy Migrations: Josephine Baker's Cinematic Celebrity
Part II: Postwar Paris and the Politics of Literature
Chapter 6. Assuming the Position: Fugitivity and Futurity in the Work of Chester Himes
Chapter 7. "One Is Mysteriously Shipwrecked Forever, in the Great New World": James Baldwin from New York to Paris
Chapter 8. Making Culture Capital: Présence Africaine and Diasporic Modernity in Post–World War II Paris
Chapter 9. Richard Wright's "Island of Hallucination" and the Gibson Affair
Chapter 10. Entering the Politics of the Outside: Richard Wright's Critique of Marxism and Existentialism
Part III: From Négritude to Migritude
Chapter 11. René, Louis, and Léopold: Senghorian Négritude as a Black Humanism
Chapter 12. Nos Ancêtres, les Diallobés: Cheikh Hamidou Kane's Ambiguous Adventure and the Paradoxes of Islamic Négritude
Chapter 13. Redefining Paris: Transmodernity and Francophone African Migritude Fiction
Chapter 14. Interurban Paris: Alain Mabanckou's Invisible Cities
Afterword: Europhilia, Francophilia, Negrophilia in the Making of Modernism
List of Contributors
Index

Author Bios