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Ships for Victory

A History of Shipbuilding under the U.S. Maritime Commission in World War II

Frederic C. Lane
with Blanche D. Coll, Gerald J. Fischer, and David B. Tyler
featuring a new preface by Arthur Donovan

Publication Date
Binding Type

During World War II, America's shipbuilding industry, mobilized under the U.S. Maritime Commission, set records of production that have never been equaled. Given the daunting task of building ships faster than they were being sunk, shipbuilding firms across the country found new ways to increase their efficiency and scale of production. Huge new shipyards were built, a labor force of 640,000 was employed, and over 55 million deadweight tons of ocean-going ships were delivered, including the famous Liberty and Victory ships. First published in 1951, Ships for Victory chronicles this remarkable...

During World War II, America's shipbuilding industry, mobilized under the U.S. Maritime Commission, set records of production that have never been equaled. Given the daunting task of building ships faster than they were being sunk, shipbuilding firms across the country found new ways to increase their efficiency and scale of production. Huge new shipyards were built, a labor force of 640,000 was employed, and over 55 million deadweight tons of ocean-going ships were delivered, including the famous Liberty and Victory ships. First published in 1951, Ships for Victory chronicles this remarkable wartime program in magisterial detail: the development of revolutionary construction methods; the upheavals in management, awarding of contracts, and allocation of steel and other materials; the recruitment, training, housing, and union activities of the workers; the crises, confusions, and scandals that arose; and the role of shipbuilding within the total war effort.

Reviews

Reviews

Tells the story of the gigantic task accomplished by American shipyards during World War II... This important book shows how the development of streamlined methods of construction made possible standards of production which would have seemed fantastic only a few years before.

An excellent and very readable account of the U.S. Maritime Commission's experience... The volume is thoroughly documented; the authors are always thoughtful of the reader in explaining technical shipping terms; and the approach is dispassionate, frank, and duly critical. The volume represents a fine addition to our wartime administrative histories.

Lane has done a pioneering job in this scholarly and monumental history of shipbuilding under the U.S. Maritime Commission in World War II... Not only a highly informative but an absorbing book.

A warts and all account of an economic and manufacturing miracle. A brilliant book.

This excellent book describe the whole programme in great detail.

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About

Book Details

Publication Date
Status
Available
Trim Size
6
x
9
Pages
944
ISBN
9780801867521
Illustration Description
28 halftones, 50 charts
Table of Contents

Preface to the 2001 Edition, by Arthur Donovan
Preface to the 1951 Edition
Chapter 1. The Commission and the Shipbuilding Industry
Chapter 2. Emergency Shipbuilding before the Declaration of War
Chapter 3

Preface to the 2001 Edition, by Arthur Donovan
Preface to the 1951 Edition
Chapter 1. The Commission and the Shipbuilding Industry
Chapter 2. Emergency Shipbuilding before the Declaration of War
Chapter 3. Design and Initial Procurement for the Liberty Ship
Chapter 4. Contracts with Shipbuilders and Their Supervision
Chapter 5. Expansion and Reorganization after Pearl Harbor
Chapter 6. Excess Capacity and the Cancellation of the Higgins Contract
Chapter 7. Speed and Productivity in Multiple Production
Chapter 8. Building the Labor Force
Chapter 9. Collective Bargaining
Chapter 10. The Battle for Steel
Chapter 11. Guiding the Flow of Materials
Chapter 12. Increasing the Supplies of Components
Chapter 13. Stabilization and Morale in the Labor Force
Chapter 14. Managing Managements
Chapter 15. Changing Managements
Chapter 16. Cracks in Welded Ships
Chapter 17. The Victory Ship
Chapter 18. Military and Minor Types
Chapter 19. The Contrast between 1943 and 1944
Chapter 20. The Manpower and Managerial Crisis
Chapter 21. Administrative Problems—(A) The Regional Offices
Chapter 22. Administrative Problems—(B) The Flow of Money
Chapter 23. Administrative Problems—(C) The Commission and the War Shipping Administration
Chapter 24. Adventures in Hindsight
Biographical Note
Index

Author Bios
Featured Contributor

Frederic Chapin Lane

Frederic C. Lane (1900-1984) was a noted maritime historian of medieval and Renaissance Venice. Among his many books are Venetian Ships and Shipbuilders of the Renaissance and Venice, A Maritime Republic.
Featured Contributor

Arthur Donovan

Arthur Donovan is a professor of humanities at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy.