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East Asian Multilateralism

Prospects for Regional Stability

edited by Kent E. Calder and Francis Fukuyama

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While the Iraq war and Middle East conflicts command the attention of the United States and most of the rest of the developed world, fundamental changes are occurring in East Asia. North Korea has tested nuclear weapons, even as it and South Korea have effectively entered a period of tepid détente; relations among China, Japan, and South Korea are a complex mixture of conflict and cooperation; and Japan is developing more forthright security policies, even as it deepens ties with the United States. Together, these developments pose vital questions for world stability and security.

In East...

While the Iraq war and Middle East conflicts command the attention of the United States and most of the rest of the developed world, fundamental changes are occurring in East Asia. North Korea has tested nuclear weapons, even as it and South Korea have effectively entered a period of tepid détente; relations among China, Japan, and South Korea are a complex mixture of conflict and cooperation; and Japan is developing more forthright security policies, even as it deepens ties with the United States. Together, these developments pose vital questions for world stability and security.

In East Asian Multilateralism, prominent international foreign affairs scholars examine the range of implications of shifting alignments in East Asia. The first part delves into the intraregional dynamics, and the second assesses current economic conditions and policies within individual East Asian states. The third section examines the challenge of regional cooperation from the perspectives of local players, while the fourth analyzes the implications for foreign policy in the United States and in Asia.

This thorough review and assessment charts the preconditions and prospects for deeper multilateralism, poses tough questions about America's security and national interests in the region, and carries a plea for more serious institution-building in the North Pacific, using the ongoing six-party process in talks on North Korea as a point of departure.

Reviews

Reviews

A 'must' for any college-level collection strong in Asian politics.

A worthwhile read for anyone interested in recent momentum towards regionalism in East Asia.

Aside from its inherent appeal to American policy wonks, the volume offers some interesting thoughts about the theory and practice of multilateralism in east Asia.

East Asian Multilateralism provides a comprehensive analysis of the major challenges for the establishment of a multilateral regional order. In particular interest is the additional focus on policy recommendations (for the US diplomacy).

The volume is well-organised, readable, and remarkably jargon-free and benefits from a multinational set of contributors with considerable expertise in the region.

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About

Book Details

Publication Date
Status
Available
Trim Size
6
x
9
Pages
296
ISBN
9780801888496
Illustration Description
14 line drawings
Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Notes on Foreign Names and Transliterations

Introduction
Part I: Beyond the Hub and Spokes
Chapter 1. Critical Junctures and the Contours of Northeast Asian

Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Notes on Foreign Names and Transliterations

Introduction
Part I: Beyond the Hub and Spokes
Chapter 1. Critical Junctures and the Contours of Northeast Asian Regionalism
Chapter 2. The History and Practice of Unilateralism in East Asia
Chapter 3. The Outlook for Economic Integration in East Asia
Chapter 4. The New Trade Bilateralism in East Asia
Part II: Country Perspectives
Chapter 5. China's Evolving Multilateralism in Asia: The Aussenpolitik and Innenpolitik Explanations
Chapter 6. China and the Impracticality of Closed Regionalism
Chapter 7. Japan and the New Security Structures of Asian Multilateralism
Chapter 8. Korean Perspectives on East Asian Regionalism
Part III: Policy Implications
Chapter 9. A New Order in East Asia?
Chapter 10. The Security Architecture in Asia and American Foreign Policy
Conclusion
Contributors
Index

Author Bios
Francis Fukuyama
Featured Contributor

Francis Fukuyama, Ph.D.

Francis Fukuyama is the Bernard L. Schwartz Professor of International Political Economy at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of The End of History and the Last Man (1992) and State-Building: Governance and World Order in the 21st Century (2004). Dr. Fukuyama is director of SAIS's International Development Program, member...