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Science for a Green New Deal

Connecting Climate, Economics, and Social Justice

Eric A. Davidson

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Science, not politics, can take us beyond the hype and headlines to forge a realistic green new deal.

Since it was first proposed in the US House of Representatives, the Green New Deal has been hotly debated, often using partisan characterizations that critique it as extreme or socialist. The intent was not simply to fight climate change or address a specific environmental concern, but rather to tackle how climate change and other environmental challenges affect the economy, the vulnerable, and social justice—and vice versa.

In Science for a Green New Deal, Eric Davidson dissects this...

Science, not politics, can take us beyond the hype and headlines to forge a realistic green new deal.

Since it was first proposed in the US House of Representatives, the Green New Deal has been hotly debated, often using partisan characterizations that critique it as extreme or socialist. The intent was not simply to fight climate change or address a specific environmental concern, but rather to tackle how climate change and other environmental challenges affect the economy, the vulnerable, and social justice—and vice versa.

In Science for a Green New Deal, Eric Davidson dissects this legislative resolution. He also shows how green new deal thinking offers a framework for a much-needed convergence of the natural sciences, social science, economics, and community engagement to develop holistic policy solutions to the most pressing issues of our day. Davidson weaves the case for linkages among multiple global crises, including a pandemic that has reversed progress on fighting poverty and hunger, an acceleration of climate change that has exacerbated storms, floods, droughts, and fires, and a renewed awareness of profound social injustices highlighted by the Black Lives Matter movement.

Illustrating these points with his personal life experiences as a child growing up in Montana and as a famed researcher leading a large scientific society, Davidson relates these complex challenges to our everyday lives and decision-making. How, he asks, can we extract from the Earth's resources what we need for the prosperity, well-being, and dignity of current and future generations of billions of people without exhausting or polluting those resources? Written in clear, jargon-free prose, Science for a Green New Deal is a realistic and optimistic look at how we can attain a more sustainable, prosperous, and just future.

Reviews

Reviews

This book is an easy yet informed read supported by strong citations. The challenge, as I see it, is to get people to read Davidson's book and act.

In this well-documented and well-written book, Davidson uses the Green New Deal as an integrating framework in addressing the present imperative for using scientific knowledge, social justice, and economic viability in a more organized and directed way. This is a book I will use, have students read, and recommend to others for a sober, well-founded perspective on the interdependent challenges that lie ahead.

Eric Davidson is one of the best 'put it together' scientists I know. In this book, he describes how to bring together scientists, farmers, early adopters of renewable energy, schoolchildren, CEOs, asset managers, and investors, which would incite a sea change in the world. He manages an incredible feat, truly connecting climate with social justice and economics—each in its broadest sense—to create an inclusive plan to manage the Anthropocene.

About

Book Details

Publication Date
Status
Available
Trim Size
6.125
x
9.25
Pages
264
ISBN
9781421444345
Illustration Description
3 b&w photos, 10 b&w illus.
Table of Contents

Foreword, by Donald F. Boesch
Preface
Chapter 1. Muddling or Dealing?
Chapter 2. No Tree, No Bee, No Honey, No Money
Chapter 3. Are There Too Few or Too Many People?
Chapter 4. Manure Happens: The

Foreword, by Donald F. Boesch
Preface
Chapter 1. Muddling or Dealing?
Chapter 2. No Tree, No Bee, No Honey, No Money
Chapter 3. Are There Too Few or Too Many People?
Chapter 4. Manure Happens: The Consequences of Feeding Over Seven Billion Human Omnivores
Chapter 5. Climate Change Viewed by a Skeptic at Heart
Chapter 6. The Luddites Had It Half-Right, but the Other Half Could Be Great News
Chapter 7. There's a Great Future in the Circular Economy
Chapter 8. Whither the Academy? A Horse of a Different Color?
Chapter 9. "And So, I'm Going to Work Tomorrow"
Acknowledgments
Notes
Index

Author Bio