Back to Results
Cover image of Putting a Name to It
New release
Cover image of Putting a Name to It
Share this Title:

Putting a Name to It

Diagnosis in Contemporary Society

Annemarie Goldstein Jutel

second edition
Publication Date
Binding Type

Outlines how the social dimensions of medical diagnosis can deepen our understanding of health.

Diagnosis is central to medicine. It creates order, explains illness, identifies treatments, and predicts outcomes. In Putting a Name to It, Annemarie Jutel presents medical diagnosis as more than a mere clinical tool, but as a social phenomenon with the potential to deepen our understanding of health, illness, and disease.

Jutel outlines how the sociology of diagnosis should function by situating it within the broader discipline, laying out the directions it should explore, and discussing how the...

Outlines how the social dimensions of medical diagnosis can deepen our understanding of health.

Diagnosis is central to medicine. It creates order, explains illness, identifies treatments, and predicts outcomes. In Putting a Name to It, Annemarie Jutel presents medical diagnosis as more than a mere clinical tool, but as a social phenomenon with the potential to deepen our understanding of health, illness, and disease.

Jutel outlines how the sociology of diagnosis should function by situating it within the broader discipline, laying out the directions it should explore, and discussing how the classification of illness and the framing of diagnosis relate to social status and order. This second edition provides important updates to the groundbreaking first edition by incorporating new research that demonstrates how the social nature of diagnosis is just as important as the clinical. It includes new perspectives on diagnostic recognition, diagnostic coding, lay diagnosis, crowdsourced diagnosis, algorithmic diagnosis, diagnostic exploitation, diagnostic systems, stigmatizing diagnosis, and contested diagnosis. The new edition also features a case study of COVID-19 from a critical sociological perspective and a new conclusion.

Both a challenge and a call to arms, Putting a Name to It is a lucid, persuasive argument for formalizing, professionalizing, and advancing long-standing practice. Jutel's innovative, open approach and engaging arguments illustrate how diagnoses have the power to legitimize our medical ailments—and stigmatize them.

Reviews

Reviews

What is diagnosis? An answer, a process, a blessing, a curse, a starting point, an end point? Annemarie Jutel's updated Putting a Name to It is an invaluable guide to understanding diagnosis as a social creation with an immense impact on patients and families. If you are looking for a diagnosis, or involved in making them, this is a MUST read!

As the leading scholar in the sociology of diagnosis, Annemarie Jutel shows how the act of naming a specific disease ripples through individual and social lives, transforming a status quo into a new reality. The book is thoughtful and critical, an analytical invitation to explore the ultimate power move of medicine: defining what ails you.

About

Book Details

Publication Date
Status
Available
Trim Size
6
x
9
Pages
216
ISBN
9781421448923
Illustration Description
2 line drawings
Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: What's in a Name?
Chapter 1: Lumping or Splitting: Classification in Medical Diagnosis
Chapter 2: Social Framing and Diagnosis: Corpulence and Fetal Death
Chapter 3: What's

Acknowledgments
Introduction: What's in a Name?
Chapter 1: Lumping or Splitting: Classification in Medical Diagnosis
Chapter 2: Social Framing and Diagnosis: Corpulence and Fetal Death
Chapter 3: What's Wrong with Me? Diagnosis and the Patient-Doctor Relationship
Chapter 4: Contested Diagnoses and the Medically Unexplained
Chapter 5: Engines of Diagnosis
Chapter 6: Technologies of Diagnosis
Chapter 7: COVID-19 as a Sociological Phenomenon
Conclusion: Directions for the Sociology of Diagnosis
References
Index

Author Bio
Featured Contributor

Annemarie Jutel, R.N., Ph.D.

Annemarie Jutel (WELLINGTON, NZ) is a professor of health and an associate dean at Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington. She is the author of Diagnosis: Truths and Tales.